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    Sandwich Tern

    Sterna sandvicensis

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    The sandwich tern is a common bird on Agger Tange. Some years, up to 200 pairs have bred on an island in the large lagoon. However, in order to want to breed, they rely on the protection that a colony of blackheaded gulls can provide. If the colony of black-headed gulls is small, then the sandwich terns only have little success.

    Experience from bird ringing at night shows that a lot of sandwich terns pass by Agger Tange on their migration from breeding grounds in the north. Flocks of sandwich terns often roost on the sand banks of the lagoon west of the house here.

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    Pied Avocet

    Recurvirostra avosetta

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    Pied avocet is easily recognizable with its white and black colours, and the upcurved bills. It is a common
    breeding bird, with between 30 and 130 breeding pairs, on Agger Tange. Pied avocets, arctic terns and sandwich terns are very dependent on blackheaded gulls which breed in relatively dense colonies. The other species can safely make their nests here. Black-headed gulls are skilled at keeping egg predators away. The blackheaded gulls will immediately chase off crows and the larger species of gulls.

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    Coot

    Fulica atra

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    Coot is a common breeding bird on Agger Tange, where it breeds in the reed beds along the lagoons and

    channels. Today, coots do not have the same opportunities to find suitable nesting sites, as they did before, because the grazing cattle have removed the fringe of reeds. It has been a conscious choice to meet the needs of the endangered, breeding waders at the expense of the more common breeding reed bed birds.

    In October-November, up to 3500-4000 coots can been seen on Agger Tange.

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    Oystercatcher

    Haematopus ostralegus

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    Oystercatcher is a common breeding bird on Agger Tange, but there are great variations each year. Years ago, oystercatchers were seen brooding at the roadside along the road between Agger and the ferry
    port. This phenomenon is no longer seen. There may be several reasons for this. Increased traffic, of both cars and cyclists, along the
    road may be one reason. There is, however, a general decline of breeding oystercatchers in the whole Limfjord-area. During the spring migration, up to 600 roosting oystercatchers can be observed.

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    Eurasian Curlew

    Numenius arquata

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    Only few pairs of eurasian curlew breed on Agger Tange. What they don’t account for in numbers, they account for in »visibility« on the vocal scene during breeding season. Their warning call ranges from a small, almost mournful whistle, to a very loud warning call indicating that you are now getting too close.

    At other times, when everything is peaceful and idyllic, you can hear a warbling whistle sound that makes

    you think of large expanses of bog in the north. In the period from July-September, approx. 300 curlews appear.The related whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) can also be seen on Agger Tange during migration, albeit in smaller numbers.

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    Mute Swan

    Cygnus olor

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    The mute swan is one of the character birds on Agger Tange that acts as both a breeding bird and a migratory bird. Many mute swans stay on Agger Tange throughout the whole breeding season. However, only about 15-20 pairs per year will produce young.

    In the middle of the summer, the number of mute swans increases to approx. 800-900 birds. These are swans that gather every year on Agger Tange to shed their flight feathers. While they moult, they are unable to fly for approx. 2-3 weeks.

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    Great Cormorant

    Phalacrocorax carbo

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    On Agger Tange, great cormorants have a breeding colony, of approx. 300 pairs, on an island in the middle of the northern lagoon.

    With binoculars, it’s easy to observe the colony from the road between Agger and the ferry port. Great cormorants fetch food in the form of fish, for their young, in the lakes north of Agger, in the Limfjord and in the North Sea. Great cormorants regurgitate undigested food particles, and it’s relatively easy to examine

    cormorant pellets to find otoliths, which are small ear stones found in fish. Each fish species has its own easily recognizable ear stone,

    which allows us to identify which fish species the great cormorant eats.

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    Greylag Goose

    Anser anser

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    The population of greylag goose, especially in Norway and Denmark, has increased dramatically since the 1990s. During the August-September period, more than 14,000 greylag geese can appear on Agger Tange. It is primarily the greylag geese coming from the breeding grounds in western Norway that come to Agger Tange.

    The geese forage during the day on the newly harvested cornfields to the east, and fly back to rest at night on Agger Tange. In the evening, it is a spectacular sight to see the many geese come in from the east, and go to rest on the surface of the water in the lagoon.

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    Pale-bellied Brent Goose

    Branta bernicla hrota

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    It is especially in early spring, that you see the pale-bellied brent goose on Agger Tange. Up to about 300 birds often stay here in the lagoon west of the house here, or on the Limfjord side north of the house.

    Pale-bellied brent goose breed on Svalbard. In some cases, you can see the darkbellied brent goose (branta bernicla bernicla), which is,

    as the name suggests, somewhat darker on the breast and sides.

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    Arctic Tern

    Sterna paradisaea

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Sandwich Tern

Sterna sandvicensis